The Relationship Between the HSPT® and Other Standardized Tests

Parents and teachers often ask how well HSPT® compares with other eighth grade standardized tests. In many validity studies, the correlations between HSPT® and other standardized tests such as the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills, Stanford Achievement Test and the STS EDSeries are very high – in the 0.70s to 0.80s, where 1.00 is perfect. The usual interpretation for these high correlations is that the HSPT® is measuring the same content as these other tests. However, at times HSPT® scores may in fact be lower than the elementary and middle school standardized test scores. The lower HSPT® scores seem to be related to differences in the norming population. The HSPT® norms are based on student populations that intend to complete high school and continue on to either two or four year college. But the typical standardized test is normed on a sample representing the entire grade population, about 1/4 to 1/3 of whom will not graduate from high school.

We are also asked how the tests students take in high school compare with the HSPT®. Once again, when we have conducted validity studies, the correlations among the HSPT®, PSAT, SAT, and ACT are quite high, even though the tests are taken two or more years later. The correlations are typically in the high 0.70s to high 0.80s. When other standardized high school achievement batteries are compared with HSPT®, the correlations are also as high. The interpretation of these correlations is that the tests are measuring much of the same or the same content.

Throughout our long history, we have routinely conducted comparisons with other tests to ensure that our data show the same kind of quality and predictive validity so that customers can continue to rely on HSPT® for placement, remediation, and scholarships.

If you have further questions, please let us know so we may assist you in further understanding of HSPT® results.

Related: HSPT® Interpretive Manual (download) This manual is included witha school’s reports. it is a guide to understanding HSPT® scores and drawing conclusions about student performance.

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